University Classes

MARI 3627: BIOLOGY AND CONSERVATION OF SHARKS, SKATES AND RAYS

Introduction

This class offers a combination of lectures, labs, and field trips that explore the elementals of elasmobranch (sharks, skate, and ray) biology, conservation and management, and shark research methods. Students are introduced to current methods used in shark research, such as tagging, and will learn and the role of sharks in ecosystems, and their global and regional conservation status.

Brendal Davis and Boris Worm co-teach this class as apart of the Seaside Summer Courses offered at Dalhousie University.

BIOLOGY 2060: INTRODUCTORY ECOLOGY

Introduction

Ecology is the study of the interrelationships of organisms and their environments. The broad subject of ecology focuses upon the interactions of plants and animals, including humans, with each other and with their non-living world. Three levels of ecology are studied: (1) Individuals, (2) Populations, (3) Communities and Ecosystems. Assignments and tutorials enlarge upon concepts presented in lectures. Students are instructed in elementary computer techniques and use the computer for most assignments. This class provides an overview of the science of ecology for the informed citizen, and also a good foundation for further work in ecology, marine biology and environmental studies.

Boris teaches the second half of this 2nd year class (Part II: Communities and Ecosystems) annually in the Winter Term*.

* Please note that Boris will be on sabbatical from teaching January to December, 2017.

BIOLOGY 3065: CONSERVATION BIOLOGY

Introduction

This class offers an introduction to conservation biology, the science of understanding and conserving biodiversity on Earth. Scientists recognize that humans are affecting biodiversity, and that the consequences are deleterious to species, ecosystems, and ultimately our society. This class has two goals: (1) to learn how patterns and changes in biodiversity are quantified and tracked over time and space, and (2) to learn about methods and tools used to prevent the extinction of species and the disruption of habitats and ecosystems. Examples will come from terrestrial, freshwater, and marine ecosystems. Tutorials involve student presentations on key papers in conservation biology as well as a written essay. Both ecological principles and the management implications of conservation biology will be discussed in detail.

This is Boris’ core class, it is a 3rd – 4th year course and is taught annually in the Winter Term.

* Please note that Boris will be on sabbatical from teaching January to December, 2017.

STANFORD@SEA 2007 and 2009: GUEST PROFESSOR

Boris helped teach this Stanford University marine biology and oceanography class aboard the sailing research vessel SSV Robert C. Seamans in 2007 and 2009.